MURPHY’S LOWER FARMINGTON RIVER BILL PASSES COMMITTEE

WASHINGTON – Today, U.S. Senator Chris Murphy (D-Conn.) applauded the U.S. Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee for passing his Lower Farmington River and Salmon Brook Wild and Scenic River Act – legislation to create a U.S. National Park Service protective designation for the Lower Farmington River and Salmon Brook – through committee. The bill will now awaits passage in the Senate.

With protective designation as a “wild and scenic river,” the Lower Farmington River and Salmon Brook – which runs through ten Connecticut towns – could receive as much as $100,000 in federal funding to assist volunteers and officials with conservation efforts. The upper portion of the river was given protected status in 1994.

“The journey to get this done started over a decade ago, when local residents in ten towns across Connecticut came together in a grassroots effort to protect the Farmington River and Salmon Brook. Now that we’ve cleared this hurdle, we’re one step closer to ensuring future generations will be able to experience the natural environment and history of these beautiful places. I’m thrilled that people here in Washington are listening to the needs of Connecticut’s local residents, and I’ll be working to get this bill passed into law as soon as possible.” 

Earlier this year, Murphy delivered testimony during a U.S. Senate Energy and Natural Resources Subcommittee on National Parks urging his Senate colleagues to move quickly to pass his Lower Farmington River and Salmon Brook Wild and Scenic River Act and calling on the National Park Service to endorse the community-driven effort to protect one of Connecticut’s most vital natural resources. Directly following Murphy’s testimony, the National Park Service announced its endorsement of Murphy’s bill.

Murphy, who initially introduced the Lower Farmington River and Salmon Brook Wild and Scenic River Act in 2012 as a member of the U.S. House of Representatives, introduced the bill in the U.S. Senate earlier this year. U.S. Congresswoman Elizabeth Esty (CT-5) introduced the companion bill in the U.S. House of Representatives. U.S. Senator Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.) and U.S. Congressman John Larson (CT-1) are cosponsors of the bill.